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Refugees and Asylum Seekers

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Migrant Refugee Kit Poster 2016 smThe Australian Catholic Migrant and Refugee Office (ACMRO) has published a kit to mark Migrant and Refugee Week and help us ponder how we can help and advocate for the rights of migrants and refugees.

refugees forever 150Along with the celebrations is the question we cannot ignore: what will happen to the 2000 people in a limbo of despair on Manus Island and Nauru, asks Loreto Sister Libby Rogerson.

capsa logoAn open letter from the Catholic Alliance for People Seeking Asylum (CAPSA) urges Australian political leaders to develop more humane responses to refugees and asylum seekers. It also informs them that CAPSA is urging voters to assess election candidates on the positions they take on refugees and asylum seekers.

Monday, 13 June 2016 23:49

2016 Refugee Week: 19-25 June

refugee wk 2016Coordinated by the Refugee Council of Australia, this is Australia's peak annual activity to raise awareness about the issues affecting refugees and to celebrate the positive contributions that they make to Australian society.

Fr Lam Vu ofmcapFr Lam Vu, refugee, architect and now Capuchin priest responded to comments made by Immigration Minister Peter Dutton that refugees are uneducated, unemployable and at the same time “taking Australian jobs”, reports The Catholic Leader.

those who came across the seasThe reality facing asylum seekers and refugees was discussed at a forum co-ordinated by the Archdiocesan Catholic Alliance for Refugees, which featured human rights lawyer and CEO of the Humanitarian Group, Helen Pearce, as guest speaker.

Sr Clare Condon sgs150Australia’s refugee and asylum seeker policies are like an infected sore eating away at the fabric of society, says Good Samaritan Sister Clare Condon.

refugees forever 150In Australia, conversation about people who seek asylum often feels disconnected from the people – the real flesh and blood people – whose lives are most affected. The reasons for this are complicated and contested., writes Good Samaritan Sister Sarah Puls.