• image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image

Gospel Reflection 2018

Br Julian McDonald cfcGod’s kingdom will come for sure and certain. It is up to all of us to wait in patience, but also in faith and hope, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcUnderneath today’s gospel can be found an invitation to us to listen to a world that is hurting and confused, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcIt is our responsibility to keep Eucharist alive and relevant, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. We will do that only by living it, by consciously being bread broken and wine poured out for others each day of our lives, by becoming what we receive.

Br Julian McDonald cfcIf the focus of today’s celebration of the Trinity is on anything, it is on the revelation that God is relational; that God reaches out in love to all of humanity, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcPentecost challenges us to respect difference, to live with the vulnerability that comes from allowing ourselves to be temporarily disoriented, and to learn to speak a language of good news that can be heard by everyone, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcThe impact of Jesus’ ascension is not limited to one time and place. It is significant for all times and places, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcIn 'laying down one's life for one's friends' we must be prepared to ask ourselves: Am I prepared to share my life fully with others or do I deal it out carefully in small doses? writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcWe are told that we are all intimately connected with Jesus and with one another - we are all branches of the one vine, we’re all together on the same journey, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. So there will always be a challenge to us to work at resolving the issues and attitudes that divide us.

Br Julian McDonald cfcIn this Sunday's gospel reading of Jesus the Good Shepherd, Jesus is at pains to alert us to the existence of “other sheep that are not of this fold” and whom he has a responsibility to lead (John 10, 16), writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. To be in tune with these people, we have to learn to walk sensitively in their cultures, not to be afraid of difference, and to be open to seeing and hearing Christ as they do.

Friday, 13 April 2018 17:13

Easter tells us 'Anything is possible'

Br Julian McDonald cfcCentral to the message of Easter for all of us is: Anything is possible, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. That’s something the first disciples struggled to grasp. It the same for me, too. If Jesus is really raised from the dead, I have to rethink everything I ever thought about what’s possible.

Br Julian McDonald cfcJesus' first words to his followers after the resurrection, "Peace be with you", invites me to stop and ask myself how I offer the sign of peace at Mass and how I reach out to the strangers who come into my life, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.  Am I big enough to offer the peace that Jesus held out on that first Easter night to those locked away in fear?

Br Julian McDonald cfcIt is truly Easter in our lives when love, generosity and compassion draw us out of our tombs of stagnation and hopelessness, when we know that the love, affirmation, acceptance and encouragement that we receive from others is nothing but the embrace of God, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. It is Easter whenever new life and hope are breathed by God’s Spirit into our hearts, our minds and our spirits.

The Palm Sunday gospel reading is a meditation on how we have contributed, actively or by omission, to the suffering and crucifixion of others, but also how we can look to bring the hope of resurrection to others by adopting the kind of compassion, kindness and encouragement which Jesus proclaimed and for which he lived and died, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcThe point of today’s gospel reading for us is that to become the people Jesus invites us to be, we have to die to whatever it is that clutters our lives and stifles growth, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. 

Br Julian McDonald cfcJesus was the incarnation of God’s love in the world. As followers of Jesus, our role is to make God’s love tangible wherever we live and work, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcThis Sunday's gospel reading invites me to ask myself when was the last time I was prepared to raise my voice in protest at the way in which elected governments treat refugees and asylum-seekers, or engage in arms trade with other governments involved in ethnic cleansing, or are unwilling to curtail the sale of guns, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. I am confronted to ask myself what has fallen off my moral radar screen.

Br Julian McDonald cfcLent is an insistent invitation to us allow our lives to be transfigured by the God who dwells within us, so that we, in our turn, can become agents of transfiguration in the lives of everyone we meet, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcLent provides an invitation and an opportunity for each of us to reflect on our mission as followers of Jesus, to decide on what we might need to embrace and from what to turn aside if we, too, like Jesus, are to live with integrity, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcThe risk and the price of taking this Sunday's gospel to heart is that in some situations, including and welcoming the “lepers” of our modern world may lead to our being excluded, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Friday, 02 February 2018 19:01

Where have I touched the face of God?

Br Julian McDonald cfcThis Sunday's Gospel invites us to pause and reflect on the opportunities of touching the face of God that come to us every day of our lives, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald. "In what experiences in the last twenty-four hours of my life was I aware of touching the face of God? How might the quality of my life change if I were to take time at the end of each day to reflect on where I have encountered the divine?"

Br Julian McDonald cfcJesus' teaching authority emanated not from his power to enforce anything on anybody, but rather from his ability to inspire others and bring out the best in them. It came from his compassion and from his ability to empathise with the people with whom he engaged, writes Christian Brother Julian McDonald.

Br Julian McDonald cfcThis Sunday's Gospel gives us a very real example of how the normal, everyday, concrete experiences of life don’t have to be a threat to faith.  Sometimes faith is an extension of those experiences, writes Brother Julian McDonald.